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    “The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat”: Book Review

    Can a carnivore appreciate a vegetarian-turned-carnivore book?

    At first, I was unsure if “The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat” by Marissa Landrigan would speak to me. But after reading it, I realized that it’s meant for anyone who wants to live a bit more ethically.

    The vivid recollection of Marissa’s journey for just food is both inspirational and heartfelt. She takes you through stories of her past which ultimately molded her into becoming an activist meat eater, who loves to cook.

    Here’s a little Preview…

    Having been raised in a family of Italians, Marissa was no stranger to homemade food. However, she never felt as strong a connection to the process of creating homemade pasta or cooking as her sisters and mother did. She spent her young adulthood on a quest for her true identity, which led her to become a bit of an unconventional foodie later in life.

    At the beginning of her book, Marissa explains how she became a vegetarian as a result of watching a PETA film. Once staunchly against consuming any type of meat, Marissa found herself questioning if vegetarianism was really the most ethical way to eat. She wondered if her choices were still making a positive impact if the process of creating her meat alternatives was often just as bad, or worse for the environment than actual meat.

    Many brands which target the environmentally conscious, such as Kashi, Boca Burger, and Cascadian Farm are actually owned by large corporations. When this kind of merge happens, it makes it difficult for the smaller brands to make choices that are best for the consumer.

    Marissa saw this huge disconnect between producer and consumer, which is the real problem with the food industry. This discovery was a turning point for her. After visiting small, sustainably owned farms, and eventually an ethical farm, she decided to turn from vegetarian to locavore meat eater. Marissa realized that she could make a greater impact on the planet by consuming food produced locally by farmers who avoid pesticides and GMO’s rather than simply abstaining from meat products.   

    My Thoughts

    This book is for anyone who wants to eat more ethically, while keeping an open mind about the options available to do so. Eating ethically isn’t necessarily just eating less meat; it’s knowing where your food comes from, how many miles it was transported to get to you, and what big name corporation may own the brand you’re buying from.

    Although reducing the amount of meat we consume as a nation would be for the better, there are many ways in which we can decide to be more sustainable. Choosing to eat locally is one of the ways we can do this. Dietary preferences are always a personal choice, but the argument that Landrigan lays out is very important and offers a less discussed perspective. To anyone who feels connected to these points, I definitely recommend this book.

    Where to find The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat

    “The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat” is being released to the public on April 29, 2017. 

    Photo of Marissa Landrigan: Heather Kresge

    About Bianca Scherrei

    Bianca is a recent Temple University graduate who finds happiness in the greener things. Her experience at a cancer research association has led her to become passionate about keeping the world a little cleaner and less toxic. In her free time, you can find her drinking La Colombe coffee while taking in the city views.

    Your thoughts . . .

    • I’m very interested in reading this book! For a few years, I avoided eating meat, although I still ate seafood. I realized that I was eventually not being very healthy about it, and transitioned back to eating meat, with a focus on local products and farms, and I find it definitely is a better way to go.

    • SWE

      if vegetarian burgers are just as bad as meat environmentally, why don’t you fucking eat vegetables instead? never heard of “whole foods”?

      of course vegetarianism isn’t the most ethical way to live. veganism is. but saying that to someone who thinks eating meat is ethical is like talking to a wall, isn’t it?

    • SWE

      if you don’t care about animals being hurt and killed, sure.